english in prep at Dubellay

improve your English language skills

April 24, 2014 at 6:16am
0 notes

Atteint d’un cancer incurable, un jeune Britannique collecte 1 million d’euros

  • Par Anaïs Mustière
  •  
  • Publié le 23/04/2014 à 19:02

La dernière photo de Stephen où il fait ses adieux aux personnes qu’il aime postée sur Facebook a provoqué une vague importante de soutien sur Twitter

Sur sa page Facebook, Stephen Sutton, 19 ans, a listé 46 voeux qu’il souhaitait réaliser. Le premier d’entre eux, collecter 10.000 livres, a été atteint, au-delà de ses espérances.

Depuis le 13 janvier 2013, Stephen Sutton sait que le cancer qui le touche est incurable. C’est suite à cette nouvelle qu’il décide de créer une page Facebook appelée «Stephen Story». Sur cette page, il publie une liste de 46 souhaits à réaliser avant de mourir.

Faire un câlin à un éléphant, faire du quad, sauter en parachute ou encore présenter un journal télévisé font partie des choses que ce jeune homme rêvait de faire avant d’être atteint par un cancer colorectal, il y a 4 ans. Sur son profil Facebook et Instagram, le jeune homme illustre au fur et à mesure la réalisation de ces 46 volontés.

En 2013, il joue de la batterie devant 90.000 personnes lors de la finale de la Ligue des Champions, à Wembley, mais son souhait numéro 1 est de collecter 10.000 livres (environ 12.000 euros) pour la fondation de lutte contre le cancer chez les jeunes (Teenage Cancer Trust). La campagne remporte un tel succès, qu’il atteint les 1 million de livres. La collecte de fonds continue sur le siteJustgiving.com, un site de financement participatif dédié aux campagnes de charité.

Un coup de pouce pour Stephen

Stephen reçoit le soutien de nombreuses personnalités, notamment de Jason Manford, un présentateur de la télévision britannique, qui a posté ce mercredi une photo, le pouce levé, en référence à une photo de Stephen sur son lit d’hôpital. Cette photo publiée sur Twitter est accompagnée d’un message pour le jeune britannique incitant les personnes qui soutiennent sa cause à collecter 1 million de livres supplémentaires pour la fondation de lutte contre le cancer.

Mercredi matin, en l’espace d’une heure, la collecte de fonds a progressé de 25.000 livres (à peu près 30.000 euros). Le mot clef #ThumbsUpForStephen a été relayé des centaines de fois depuis. Des photos d’enfants, de jeunes adolescents et de parents circulent sur la Toile pour soutenir la cause du jeune britannique.

Le jeune homme a posté une photo sur sa page Facebook expliquant: «C’est la dernière photo de moi les pouces levés. C’est dommage que tout se finisse de cette façon». Stephen a réalisé 35 des rêves inscrits sur sa liste.

April 23, 2014 at 8:07pm
0 notes

Why France is America’s Repressed Fantasy

Renée Kaplan, l’Amie américaine

News, buzz and analysis about France.


Search



Is France America's repressed fantasy? Catherine Deneuve in Luis Bunuel's Belle de Jour.

Is France America’s repressed fantasy? Catherine Deneuve in Luis Bunuel’s Belle de Jour.

Last week a crazy rumor about France went viral across American media. Someone, somewhere, suggested that in France they’d passed a law forbidding employees from sending work emails after 6 p.m. Ridiculous, right? France is a free-market democracy and the 5th biggest economy in the world, how could you even imagine a law like that? Except that everyone bought it and the rumor spread like wildfire.

What was so easy to believe about it? How come the idea that the French would legally shut down work emails at quitting time was so…credible? How come you’re smirking now as you read this?

If there’s one thing that irritates the French about Americans, it’s when they accuse them of being lazy. If there’s one thing Americans (and Brits) love to think about the French, it’s that they have the option not to work that hard and that the French government fervently enforces this right seemingly not to be productive. The preferred counter-argument to this is the French claim that despite their reputation, statistics show they are actually among the world’s most efficient in terms of hourly labor productivity.

But when the British newspaper The Guardian first published a story about a deal between the French employers’ federation and labor unions requiring staff to switch off their phones after 6pm, with the temptingly shareable headline “When the French Clock Off at 6pm, They Really Mean It,” it got picked up all over UK and US media, from the New York Times(“A Move to Limit Off-the-Clock Work Emails”) to New York magazine (“Two French Unions Ban Checking Work Emails After 6pm”) to USA Today (“France Bans Work Email After 6pm”).

Even Perez Hilton, Hollywood-based celebrity blogger, found the story worthy enough—amusing enough? Enviable enough? Eccentric and social media friendly enough?—to publish a post about it which he then tweeted to his nearly six million followers. Who knew he was such a Francophile.

The Guardian article was not exactly accurate and the newspaper later published corrections. The accord between unions and corporate representatives seeks to guarantee employees in some high-tech and consulting sectors the “rest” period of 11 consecutive hours to which they are legally entitled. These are employees who contractually do not benefit from the (infamous) 35-hour French work week. There was no imposed cut-off time for emails and the agreement, which would actually affect only 250,000 workers and not one million as the Guardian story claimed, has yet to be approved by the French Labor Ministry.

French reaction the global buzz about their new quitting time ranged from indignant to just weary. After all, the French are used to the rest of the world’s stereotype of them as long-vacation-taking, short-work-week employees. As the French edition of Slate wrote: “As seen from the Unites States or England, French labor law is often summed up as a series of policies created by bureaucrats in order to make sure that lazy workers can get away with doing as little as possible.”

Nonetheless, they really don’t appreciate it. They even have a name (in English!) for what they see as a kind of chronic aggression—French-bashing (“frahntsch-bahsheeng”)—and the grumbling was heard all over social media. Objectively, it was actually a little surprising how fast this (false) story took off. Enough that it actually culminated in a public denial on Twitter by France’s minister of the digital economy, Axelle Lemaire.

Which brings us back to the essential question of why it is that Anglo-Saxon media was so ready to believe the story.

There is something terribly gratifying for Anglos about the idea that there is this place that—in their imaginations at least—is so flagrantly against work. For cultures like the US where there is so much value invested in the idea of work, where working hard is so deeply rooted in the national identity and folklore of social mobility, one of the core values upon which America the great is built—well, for a place like that, actually wanting not to work hard isn’t really something you would readily admit. Because if you don’t work hard in America, who are you? You are, to some extent, a failure.

Or you are, in these overworked imaginations, French. France—or, to be fair, a certain fantasy of France—has become this place where eccentric social values and market-resistant leftist politics encourage not working hard. Fantasy France is both a France that doesn’t entirely exist, as this inaccurate story revealed, and a France that is a kind of dirty secret, something too wrong to admit to desiring. The France of the 35-hour work week, of the 6pm cut-off for work emails, of the long summer vacation months—that France has become a place where Americans can safely project their secret fantasies.

Imagining—and disparaging—this Fantasy France that deliberately doesn’t work hard is a way to sublimate a desire too shameful, too un-American to admit. A perfect recent example is this much buzzed-about Cadillac ad for their first electric car, where you see a chest-pounding corporate tool with the rich man’s essential accessories—big house, big pool, big car—explaining why “we work so hard.” The answer is…because we’re not French! Other countries, they work, stroll home, they stop by the cafe, they take August off. Off. Why aren’t you like that? Why aren’t we like that? Because we’re crazy driven hard workers, that’s why. And in the end, the ad implies, you get the Caddy. The French? They get August off. As for all the stuff? That’s the upside of only taking two weeks off in August. N’est-ce pas?

We have to be able to belittle France, to scoff condescendingly at the quaintness of this land of leisure…. as we mete out our three weeks of annual vacation and tally our billable hours before the bonus talk with the boss who stays in the office even later than we do every night. Because if the French can have their leisure and love themselves too, well, what does that say about us?

Thank goodness the French have such preposterous and laughable ideas about work! Who would want to live like them?

This entry was posted in Non classé and tagged , by Renée. Bookmark the permalink.

ONE THOUGHT ON “WHY FRANCE IS AMERICA’S REPRESSED FANTASY

  1. François on 22 April 2014 at 23 h 38 min said:

    Thank you so much for the interesting article, Renée, and especially for the advert that says so much about how France is viewed by some in the US… The humo(u)rless, flag-waving bit about the car-keys-left-on-the-Moon-vehicle put me off in a big way, however “us” French are just as guilty when it comes to waving our own flag… A particularly cringe-worthy quote comes to mind, incessantly drummed in our ears, claiming that ours is “THE land of human rights”… It goes to show that the French and the Americans (although I don’t like to generalise/generalize) are undoubtedly united by a common bond, having as a common trait this overinflated ego which they both see as “arrogance” in each other’s national psyches… Which brings me to my final point: what about casting aside flag waving, and opting for flag-“waiving” instead?

8:02pm
0 notes

Thomas Piketty : « Le retour des inégalités inquiète aux Etats-Unis »

Le Monde.fr | 23.04.2014 à 02h24 • Mis à jour le 23.04.2014 à 08h46 |Par Stéphane Lauer (New York, correspondant)

 
Un mois après sa sortie aux Etats-Unis, le livre de l'économiste français, qui a notamment été reçu à la Maison Blanche, s'est classé mardi en tête des ventes aux Etats-Unis sur Amazon.

Un mois après sa sortie aux Etats-Unis, le livre de l’économiste français Thomas Piketty, consacré à la montée des inégalités dans le monde, Capital in the Twenty-First Century (Le Capital au XXIe siècle), s’est classé, mardi 22 avril, en tête des ventes aux Etats-Unis sur le site de distribution en ligne Amazon. Il fait également partie de la liste des meilleures ventes du New York Times.

Reçu il y a quelques jours à la Maison Blanche et au ministère des financesaméricain, M. Piketty enchaîne les colloques et les conférences aux Etats-Unis aux côtés de Prix Nobel d’économie afin de dénoncer l’extrême concentration des richesses et plaider pour une plus forte taxation des hauts revenus.

Lire notre décryptage : L’économiste français Thomas Piketty triomphe aux Etats-Unis

La sortie de votre livre aux Etats-Unis suscite un large débat. Etes-voussurpris par son retentissement ?

C’est vrai qu’on est en train d’atteindre la borne supérieure à laquelle je pouvais m’attendre. En même temps, cela fait longtemps que notre travail, avec Emmanuel Saez, sur les inégalités, suscite beaucoup d’intérêt à chaque publication. Là, la nouveauté, c’est qu’il s’agit d’un travail plus global, il est donc normal que cela retienne plus l’attention. Mais si j’ai écrit une histoire de la dynamique des inégalités c’est pour qu’elle puisse être lue par le plus grand nombre. Je suis surpris du succès, mais en même temps le but était de toucherun maximum de gens.

Est-ce que vous vous attendiez à des critiques aussi élogieuses dans ce pays, et à la limite plus élogieuses que celles que vous avez reçues enFrance, alors que les Etats-Unis ont plutôt la réputation d’être moins réceptifs au thème de l’inégalité ?

La réalité, c’est que les inégalités ont beaucoup plus augmenté aux Etats-Unis qu’en Europe au cours des trente ou quarante dernières années. De ce point de vue, ce n’est pas étonnant que le problème soit très présent dans le débat américain. Le retour des inégalités inquiète ici.

Mais les Etats-Unis ont toujours une relation beaucoup plus compliquée avec cette problématique que ce que l’on imagine parfois en Europe. C’est un pays qui a une tradition égalitaire très forte, qui s’est construit autour de cette question en opposition à une Europe elle-même confrontées à des inégalités de classe ou patrimoniales. Ensuite, il ne faut pas oublier que ce sont les Etats-Unis qui, il y a un siècle, ont inventé un système de fiscalité progressif sur les revenus justement parce qu’ils avaient peur de devenir aussi inégalitaire que l’Europe.

Par rapport aux tendances longues que vous décrivez dans votre livre, celui-ci aurait pu être écrit il y a cinq ans voire dix ans. Pensez-vous qu’il aurait eu autant de retentissement aux Etats-Unis ? Finalement, n’arrive-t-il pas à un moment propice, au lendemain de la crise financière ?

Ce livre arrive effectivement à un moment où la question est particulièrement prégnante aux Etats-Unis, même s’il reste de difficile de savoir comment il aurait été reçu il y a dix ans. Mais ce dont on parle moins, mais qui me fait autant plaisir, c’est que la traduction en anglais a permis également d’ouvrir le débat au niveau européen.

On doit reconnaître aux Etats-Unis la capacité de s’emparer de débats qui dérangent. En même temps, on n’a pas le sentiment que les politiques publiques sont vraiment prêtes à bouger, même si Barack Obama fait preuve de volontarisme dans son discours. Est-ce que cela veut dire qu’il n’est pas déjà trop tard pour renverser cette tendance aux inégalités et que l’argent influence déjà la politique de manière irréversible ?

Ça, c’est la vision sombre du problème. Je me méfie de ce pessimisme. Toute l’histoire de la répartition des richesses et de l’impôt est pleine de surprises et les choses peuvent évoluer beaucoup plus vite qu’on ne l’aurait imaginé. Aux Etats-Unis en particulier. Qui, il y a un peu plus d’un siècle, aurait dit que l’impôt fédéral sur le revenu serait un jour créé ou qu’on aurait instauré une très forte progressivité à partir des années 1920 ? Pas grand monde, certainement. Pourtant, l’argument était déjà de dire qu’une grande partie de notre processus démocratique était capturé par une minorité. Mais les institutions démocratiques ont fini par répondre à ce constat.

Vous apportez une contribution majeure au débat sur les inégalités. Quelles peuvent être les retombées concrètes en termes de décision politique ?

Ce livre n’est qu’un élément dans un débat plus large qui contribue à s’interrogersur la concentration excessive des revenus et des patrimoines. Maintenant, il faut que les mesures qui pourraient être prises soient renouvelées : l’impôt progressif que j’appelle de mes vœux n’est pas le même que l’impôt sur les revenus ou sur les successions mis en place au XXe siècle. Par exemple, l’impôt sur le patrimoine est à repenser. Mais ce n’est pas un livre qui va changer le cours de l’histoire.

Même si le Prix Nobel d’économie Paul Krugman dit que c’est certainement le plus important de la décennie ? Ça finit par vous gêner, ce concert de louanges ?

Non, ça fait plaisir, même si c’est un peu tôt pour évaluer l’impact de ce livre.

On lit beaucoup moins de critiques virulentes sur votre travail. Comment interprétez-vous ce silence de façade alors que les contempteurs de votre théorie sont sans doute nombreux et ont un accès à la parole publique relativement facile ?

On les entend peu parce que mon livre n’est pas un ouvrage de théorie ou de spéculation. A la fin, je tire des conclusions avec lesquelles on peut ne pas êtred’accord, mais la grande majorité du livre est constituée d’exposés sur l’évolution historique des inégalités du patrimoine. Je pense que c’est quelque chose qui n’est pas facile à écarter d’un revers de main. Il s’agit avant tout d’un livre d’histoire qui met sur la table des faits historiques. Après, les gens peuvent en tirer d’autres conclusions pour la suite, mais le constat est difficilement contestable. C’est d’ailleurs l’intérêt du livre de remettre l’histoire au centre d’un débat qui est souvent idéologique.

Pensez-vous qu’aux Etats-Unis le fait d’être Français relativise la portée de votre de travail, la France étant parfois caricaturée sur le plan idéologique ?

Cet argument n’est pas trop utilisé ici. Globalement, je crois que les commentateurs ont compris que je ne suis pas un atroce anti-Américain. Encore une fois ce sont les Etats-Unis qui ont inventé le système de l’impôt progressif sur les revenus et les successions et non pas la France ou l’Allemagne. J’essaye d’enappeler à cette tradition progressiste américaine et je pense que c’est ce message qui passe bien et évite d’être caricaturé comme le Français qui vientdonner des leçons aux Etats-Unis.

Certains en France avaient qualifié votre théorie de « marxisme de sous-préfecture ». Maintenant que ce « marxisme de sous-préfecture » rencontre une certaine résonance aux Etats-Unis, qu’avez-vous envie de leur répondre ?

C’est sans doute toujours mieux de lire avant d’écrire. C’est amusant de voir queThe Economist ou le Financial Times se révèlent plus ouverts que certains journaux français. Ce qui me gêne, c’est que, d’une certaine façon, cette anecdote est révélatrice de l’état du débat dans notre pays. Il y a une telle peur du déclassement en France qu’on est en permanence dans un débat électrisé entre des gens de droite qui accusent des gens de gauche de vouloir tuer la compétitivité du pays et qui n’arrivent même plus à lire et à regarder ce que pense l’autre.

6:08am
0 notes

David Cameron se redécouvre chrétien

David Cameron se redécouvre chrétien

Le Monde.fr | 22.04.2014 à 17h44 • Mis à jour le 22.04.2014 à 18h29 |Par Eric Albert (Londres, correspondance)

Le premier ministre britannique David Cameron, à Bruxelles, le 21 mars.

Quand il était à Downing Street, le très religieux Tony Blair avait reçu l’interdiction formelle de son conseiller en communication, Alastair Campbell, de parler de sa foi. Ce dernier, face à un journaliste insistant, avait eu cette fameuse phrase : « we don’t do God » (« on ne parle pas de Dieu »). La ferveur trop visible du premier ministre britannique d’alors – désormais converti au catholicisme - lui semblait une bombe politique qu’il valait mieux ne pas toucher.

L’actuel résident de Downing Street a choisi l’approche inverse. David Cameron est bien moins pratiquant que son prédécesseur. Cet anglican bon teint fréquente les églises de façon épisodique, et n’est pas du genre à prier ouvertement. Plaisantant, il a un jour décrit sa foi comme disparaissant et réapparaissant,« comme Magic FM [une station de radio] dans les Chilterns [la campagne près d’Oxford] ».

« ÉTENDRE LE RÔLE DES ORGANISATIONS RELIGIEUSES »

Mais, miracle pascal, il a lancé une offensive depuis quelques semaines pourdéfendre son identité chrétienne. Le 9 avril, face à un rassemblement de leaders religieux, il a déclaré : « Je suis fier que nous soyons un pays chrétien. » Avant d’ajouter : « Notre religion est la plus persécutée de toutes aujourd’hui. »

Face aux premières réactions virulentes, M. Cameron a choisi de repartir à l’offensive. Dans une tribune publiée juste avant Pâques dans Church Times, un magazine anglican, il a repris le même thème. « Nous devons être plus confiant de notre statut de pays chrétien, plus ambitieux pour étendre le rôle des organisations religieuses, et franchement, plus évangéliques. »

Le premier ministre britannique David Cameron, lors de l'hommage rendu à Nelson Mandela le 3 mars à l'abbaye de Westminster à Londres. AFP/JOHN STILLWELL

La réplique est arrivée lundi 21 avril dans une lettre ouverte, signée d’une cinquantaine de scientifiques, philosophes, écrivains… « Nous rejetons la qualification de la Grande-Bretagne comme un “pays chrétien”. » Les auteurs, dont les écrivains Philip Pullman et Terry Pratchett, rappellent que toutes les études montrent que la société britannique est de moins en moins religieuse. La proportion de chrétiens est passée de 72% en 2001 à 59% en 2011. Pendant la même période, les Britanniques se déclarant sans religion sont passés de 15% à 25%.

Lire également : FOI – La Grande-Bretagne est-elle un pays chrétien ? David Cameron lance le débat

DIFFICULTÉS AVEC LE NOUVEL ARCHEVÊQUE

Institutionnellement, M. Cameron peut bien sûr se prévaloir de bons arguments. LeRoyaume-Uni n’a pas de séparation formelle entre l’Eglise et l’Etat. La reine, chef de l’Etat, est aussi « gouverneur suprême » de l’Eglise d’Angleterre. Les évêques anglicans siègent à la chambre des Lords.

Néanmoins, l’intervention de M. Cameron s’explique probablement de façon plus prosaïque. Selon M. Campbell, elle ressemble surtout à une « tactique » politicienne. Le premier ministre se trouve être en difficultés avec Justin Welby, le nouvel archevêque de Canterbury, en poste depuis un an. Le leader spirituel de l’Eglise d’Angleterre a multiplié les attaques contre la politique sociale du gouvernement jugée trop brutale contre les plus pauvres.

Pour son sermon de Pâques, Justin Welby est revenu à la charge : « Dans ce pays, alors même que l’économie s’améliore, il y a des familles brisées et en pleurs, honteuses de devoir demander de l’aide aux banques alimentaires, ou effrayées par les dettes. » M. Cameron, qui ne veut surtout pas perdre le vote anglican, se devait de réagir. La résurrection du Christ, tombant opportunément un mois avant les élections locales et européennes, était l’opportunité idéale.

  • Eric Albert (Londres, correspondance) 
    Journaliste au Monde

4:06am
0 notes

« Les Roumains ont de plus gros pénis que vous »… Les Anglais s’amusent de la pub europhobe

Pierre Haski | Cofondateur Rue89


Le logo de l’Ukipa (Via Wikipédia)

Le parti eurosceptique britannique Ukip a lancé une campagne-choc de panneaux anti-immigration en vue des élections européennes, s’attirant une vaste contre-attaque humoristique décapante.

A l’United Kingdom Independence Party qui pointe dans sa campagne les dangers de l’immigration de masse pour les Britanniques, les parodies qui fleurissent sur les réseaux sociaux répondent de manière hilarante, tel ce faux panneau qui fait les délices de Twitter :

« Les Roumains ont de plus gros pénis que vous et peuvent faire rire votre femme comme elle le faisait autrefois. Dites non à l’immigration de masse. »

« Devinez quels enfants les migrants veulent manger… »

Un autre demande, avec un doigt pointé vers le lecteur, comme dans l’affiche de propagande « Uncle Sam Wants You » :

« Devinez quels enfants les migrants de l’Union européenne veulent manger… »

La vraie campagne de l’Ukip, elle, est tout aussi efficace, mais pas pour faire rire : pour effrayer.

Le parti de Nigel Farage, qui peut espérer faire un bon score aux élections européennes du mois prochain, a axé sa campagne sur le danger, celui de l’immigration, celui des eurocrates, celui de l’Europe tout simplement. Il a bénéficié d’un don d’1,5 million de livres (1,8 million d’euros) de l’homme d’affaires eurosceptique Paul Sykes, hier encore soutien du Parti conservateur.

A ceux qui l’accusent de mener une campagne « raciste », Nigel Farage a répondu avec mépris qu’elle ne gênerait que ceux qui passent leur temps à tchater sur Internet…

« Devinez après quel boulot ils vont courir ? »

Un de ces panneaux proclame, là aussi avec le doigt pointé vers le lecteur :

« 26 millions de personnes cherchent du travail en Europe. Devinez après quel boulot ils vont courir ? »


Panneau de l’Ukip (DR)

Un autre montre un travailleur britannique faisant la manche sur un trottoir, avec comme slogan : « La politique européenne en action ». Et en sous-titre :

« Les travailleurs britanniques sont durement frappés par le travail bon marché illimité. »


Panneau de l’Ukip (DR)

Le quatrième parti britannique

Fondé en 1993, le parti Ukip, qui se décrit comme « eurosceptique », a fait une percée aux élections locales de 2013 en Grande-Bretagne, revendiquant le titre de quatrième parti du royaume en nombre d’élus.

Il compte neuf eurodéputés dans le Parlement européen sortant, dont son leader Nigel Farage, et espère améliorer son score au prochain scrutin.

Nigel Farage a récemment repoussé les avances de Marine Le Pen pour se joindre à l’alliance de partis d’extrême droite qu’elle tente de forger, afin de pouvoir créer un groupe au sein du prochain Parlement européen.

April 22, 2014 at 8:29am
0 notes

Meet Mr Poo, UNICEF’s new anti-public defecation mascot whose mission is to encourage children to use the loo

  • The ad is designed to encourage children to use the loo in India
  • Open defecation is almost universal amongst the poorest 20%
  • The ad stars a stool called Mr Poo that chases people to toilets

By LEON WATSON

This may be one of the most bizarre public service adverts ever screened - and it is funded by the UNICEF.

Starring a giant stool called Mr Poo that chases people to the toilets, the ad is designed to encourage children to use the loo in India.

In a country where only half of the population uses toilets, the United Nations Children’s Fund want to tackle public health head on.

Scroll down for video

On the run: A man is chased by a giant stool called Mr Poo in UNICEF's bizarre anti-defecation advert

On the run: A man is chased by a giant stool called Mr Poo in UNICEF’s bizarre anti-defecation advert

On a mission: The hero, Mr Poo, collars a man before showing him the way to the loo

On a mission: The hero, Mr Poo, collars a man before showing him the way to the loo

The ‘Poo2Loo’ campaign seeks to bring people’s attention to the health hazards associated with public defecation, CNN reported.

According to UNICEF, India has the highest number of people in the world - an estimated 620 million - who defecate in public.

Studies show open defecation is almost universal amongst the poorest 20 per cent of India’s population and more than 28 million children lack access to toilets in their schools.

It creates a major public health hazard by leaving an estimated 65 million kilograms of waste each day.

The bizarre advert that aims to get kids to poo in a toilet
Causing a stink: The ad highlights the health benefits of using the loo, and not defecating in public

Causing a stink: The ad highlights the health benefits of using the loo, and not defecating in public

Giant poos appear before tourists getting off a flight, showing India would not be a nice place if there was too much defecation

Giant poos appear before tourists getting off a flight, showing India would not be a nice place if there was too much defecation

Mr Poo rears his ugly head on a cricket pitch to deliver his public health message

Mr Poo rears his ugly head on a cricket pitch to deliver his public health message

Children face a huge risk of contracting bacterial infections, with over 44 per cent of mothers disposing their children’s waste in the open.

Diarrhoea remains one of the top causes of child deaths in the country, alongside respiratory infections.

With an animated video, a catchy song with ‘toilet sounds’, and even a smartphone application, the digitally-led campaign is targeted at the country’s youth.

UNICEF spokeswoman Maria Fernandez said the campaign uses ‘quirky, informative and inspiring language’.

'It also contains humour to better connect with the target audience,' she added. 'Once they [the youth] are exposed to the issue… they will be encouraged to know more.'



8:20am
0 notes

Commuters face five days of disruption as rail workers stage a series of strikes in three separate disputes including ticket office closures, pensions and pay

  • Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union to strike
  • Industrial action against London Underground, TfL and Heathrow Express
  • Underground workers to walk out for 40 hours from 9pm on April 28
  • There will be a further strike in ticket office row from 9pm on May 5
  • First strikes held ahead of event in memory of Bob Crow and Tony Benn
  • RMT admin workers at TfL will strike in dispute over pensions
  • Union is also staging a Heathrow Express strike over jobs, pay and cuts

By LUCY CROSSLEY

Commuters are facing five days of travel disruption as rail workers stage a series of strikes in three separate disputes over issues including pay, pensions and jobs.

Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union will take industrial action against London Underground (LU), Transport for London (TfL) and the Heathrow Express in the coming weeks.

Underground workers will walk out for 48 hours from 9pm on April 28 and again for three days from 9pm on May 5 in the long-running row over Tube ticket office closures.

Disruption: Following a tube strike in February, commuters are facing five days of travel disruption as rail workers stage a series of strikes starting later this month

Disruption: Following a tube strike in February, commuters are facing five days of travel disruption as rail workers stage a series of strikes starting later this month

Repeat: The latest round of strikes comes after a two-day strike in February caused transport issues across London, and a second planned strike was called off at the eleventh hour

Repeat: The latest round of strikes comes after a two-day strike in February caused transport issues across London, and a second planned strike was called off at the eleventh hour

The latest round of strikes comes after a two-day strike in February caused transport issues across London, and a second planned strike was called off at the eleventh hour.

TfL said it would review ticket office closures station by station, which could result in some ticket offices remaining open.

 

The concession gave them a two-month breathing space for further talks, but these have now failed - leading to the latest round of strikes.

The first two days of action will take place ahead of a May Day event in London in memory of former RMT leader Bob Crow, and Tony Benn, who died within days of each other last month.

Dispute: The RMT is also staging a strike at the Heathrow Express train service for 48 hours from 3am on April 29 in a row over jobs, pay and cuts

Dispute: The RMT is also staging a strike at the Heathrow Express train service for 48 hours from 3am on April 29 in a row over jobs, pay and cuts

RMT members at TfL, who work in admin roles, will strike for 48 hours from 9pm on April 28 in a dispute over pensions.

The union is also staging a strike at the Heathrow Express train service for 48 hours from 3am on April 29 in a row over jobs, pay and cuts.

The union said plans to re-organise the workforce to save £6 million over the next five years threatened 201 jobs.

'RMT does not buy for a moment the case for handing out savage cuts to Heathrow Express when Heathrow is generating hand-outs to shareholders of over £600 million,' said RMT acting general secretary Mick Cash.

Action: Commuters are pictured walking at Waterloo station in London, England, in an attempt to avoid the crowded tube trains during February's strike

Action: Commuters are pictured walking at Waterloo station in London, England, in an attempt to avoid the crowded tube trains during February’s strike

Alternative: Commuters board the extra buses put on to help ease the disruption caused by the last strike at Stratford Station

Alternative: Commuters board the extra buses put on to help ease the disruption caused by the last strike at Stratford Station

However, Keith Greenfield, managing director of Heathrow Express, said he hoped that an agreement with the union could be reached.

'We remain eager to continue our productive discussions with RMT union reps and we still hope they choose to resolve the dispute around the table rather than through damaging industrial action,' he said.

'A strike is not the answer. It will increase costs when we are trying to reduce them, taking us further away from what we need to do to secure our business for the future.

Remembrance: The first two days of action will take place ahead of a May Day event in London in memory of former RMT leader Bob Crow (pictured), and Tony Benn, who died within days of each other last month
Veteran politician Tony Benn died at his home at the age of 88

Remembrance: The first two days of action will take place ahead of a May Day event in London in memory of former RMT leader Bob Crow (left), and Tony Benn (right), who died within days of each other last month

Memorial: A poster in honour of Bob Crow is displayed at Putney Bridge underground station following his death

Memorial: A poster in honour of Bob Crow is displayed at Putney Bridge underground station following his death

'However, we will not let it stop us providing an excellent service for our customers. We have a robust contingency plan that will enable us to run regular trains for as long as any industrial action lasts.'

The union continues to be opposed to plans to close Tube ticket offices on London Underground, saying hundreds of jobs will be lost.

LU maintains that only three per cent of tickets are bought at offices now, and has pledged to switch staff to other areas of stations.



8:18am
0 notes

'It's OK to drink six pints a day': Alcohol expert says up to 13 daily units AREN'T harmful for health

  • Dr Kari Poikolainen says moderate drinking is better than abstaining
  • Also claims that a bottle of wine every day won’t harm health 

It’s news that beer lovers such as Homer Simpson have been waiting for. 

Drinking up to six pints a day is OK for your health, a leading alcohol scientist has claimed.

Dr Kari Poikolainen, who used to work for the World Health Organisation as an alcohol expert, examined decades of research into its effects. 

Scroll down for video

Underestimated? Drinking up to six pints a day is OK for your health, a leading alcohol scientist has claimed

Underestimated? Drinking up to six pints a day is OK for your health, a leading alcohol scientist has claimed

Limits: A pint of beer contains around two units. Men are currently meant to have no more than four units a day, and women three

Limits: A pint of beer contains around two units. Men are currently meant to have no more than four units a day, and women three

He believes believes drinking only becomes harmful when people consume more than around 13 units a day.

Men are currently meant to have no more than four units a day but women are supposed to have three units.

 

This equates to 21 units for men and 14 for women. A pint of beer contains around two units. 

Dr Poikolainen also claimed that people who exceed the recommended limit could live longer than teetotallers.

The Finnish scientist said: ’The weight of the evidence shows moderate drinking is better than abstaining and heavy drinking is worse than abstaining – however the moderate amounts can be higher than the guidelines say.’

A helpful animation for the facts and figures on units of alcohol
Bottoms up: Dr Poikolainen also claims that a bottle of wine a day is not harmful for health

Bottoms up: Dr Poikolainen also claims that a bottle of wine a day is not harmful for health

He added that drinking just over a bottle of wine a day won’t harm health, either. A bottle contains 10 units. 

But Julia Manning, from think-tank 2020Health, said: ‘This is an unhelpful contribution to the debate. It makes grand claims which we don’t see evidence for.’ She added: ‘Alcohol is a toxin, the risks outweigh the benefits.’



8:14am
0 notes

Do you dream of living mortgage-free? Debt now lasts well into retirement with 320,000 over-65s STILL paying off home loans

  • Number of over-65s with a mortgage rises 20% in two years
  • At the same time, the number of under-35s with a home loan fell 8%
  • 7.6% rise for first-time-buyers, 6.5% increase for people on property ladder

By MATT CHORLEY, MAILONLINE POLITICAL EDITOR

People who dream of paying off their mortgage face the prospect of still being in debt well into their retirement.

Official figures show there are more than 320,000 people aged over-65 who are not living mortgage-free.

The number has risen by 20 per cent in two years, and with house prices soaring there are fears many of those struggling to get on to the property today might never clear their debts.

More than 320,000 over-65 households are still paying off their mortgage, a rise of 20 per cent in two years

More than 320,000 over-65 households are still paying off their mortgage, a rise of 20 per cent in two years

Most people in their twenties and thirties can only afford to a buy a house or flat by taking out a mortgage, in the hope that they will pay it off by earning more later in their career.

But a combination of soaring house prices, lower wages and poor pensions returns mean more and more people who would hope to have cleared their debts before retiring are still paying off a mortgage.

New figures show that in 2012-13 a total of 326,000 families where the head of the household is over-65 and still paying a mortgage. It equates to one in 20 of all over-65 households.

The number has risen by 57,000 since 2010, an increase of more than 20 per cent.

At the same time the number of under-35s buying with a mortgage has fallen from 1.38 million in 2010-11 to 1.27million last year.

In a further blow to those struggling to get on the property ladder, prices are rising faster for first-time buyers as demand for starter homes outstrips supply.

In particular, the government’s Help to Buy scheme aimed at people wanting to own their first home, has seen thousands of people flood the market, driving up prices.

In January prices for those buying their first home were up 7.6 per cent, compared with 6.5 per cent for owner-occupiers, the Office for National Statistics said.

House prices are rising fastest for first-time buyers, with demand highest for the sort of start homes which are popular with people trying to get on to the property ladder

House prices are rising fastest for first-time buyers, with demand highest for the sort of start homes which are popular with people trying to get on to the property ladder

It suggests young people are struggling to on to the first rung of the property ladder, which means they will be paying off a mortgage until much later in life.

Pensions minister Steve Webb said: ‘According to the latest English Housing Survey there are approximately 6 million households in England, where the household reference person is aged 65 or over.

‘Of these, around 326,000 are owner occupiers who are buying their home with a mortgage.

‘Based on these figures, the Department estimates that approximately 5 per cent of pensioner households are likely to be paying a mortgage.’

According to the English Housing Survey, mortgages are ‘typically paid back over 15 years or more’.

However, with house prices up 6.8 per cent in a year – and 13 per cent in London – many young and first-time buyers are forced to take out much longer loans.

‘For this reason many people do not own their home outright until later in life,’ the study found.

‘Of those households that own outright, 60 per cent (4.3 million households) had a household reference person aged 65 or over.

‘The requirement for a large deposit can make it difficult for people in their 20s to get onto the property ladder.’

People in their twenties and thirties are more likely to be renting, while those aged 45 and over are more likely to have bought a property

People in their twenties and thirties are more likely to be renting, while those aged 45 and over are more likely to have bought a property

People in their twenties and thirties are more likely to be renting, while those aged 45 and over are more likely to have bought a property.

However, the rise in over-65s still paying off a mortgage could in part explain why the number of  people in the same age group with a job has double to more than a million in the past decade.

The stock market crash in 2002, triggered by the dot.com bubble bursting, wiped billions off pensions.

Ros Altmann, a former government pensions adviser, said: ‘It is certainly a concern to see an increase in the number of pensioners still paying off their mortgages. 

‘This could well be the result of pension funds not providing enough money in retirement or endowment mortgages that have fallen short of expectations, leaving pensioners struggling to repay their debts. 

‘The financial crisis has hit many people’s pensions and disappointing market returns have left endowment policies with large shortfalls.’



April 21, 2014 at 7:06am
0 notes

texte écricome n° 18 session 2013

texte de colle à préparer par les premiers de chaque groupe de colle

semaine du 21 avril 2014

5:51am
0 notes

La reine Elizabeth II se fait tirer un portrait malicieux

Pour ses 88 ans, la reine Elizabeth a posé devant l’objectif du photographe David Bailey.

Capter la «lueur de malice» dans le regard de la reine Elizabeth II: c’est l’objectif que s’est fixé le photographe David Bailey pour ce nouveau portrait. Pour ses 88 ans, la souveraine a posé devant son objectif à Buckingham Palace, sa résidence à Londres, en mars dernier. Mais l’image n’a été rendue publique qu’à la veille de son anniversaire.

Sur l’image en noir et blanc, elle arbore un grand sourire, collier de perles autour du cou et vêtue d’une robe dessinée par Angela Kelly, son assistante personnelle depuis douze ans.

«Elizabeth II a des yeux bienveillants avec une lueur de malice dans le regard. J’ai toujours aimé les femmes fortes et elle est une femme très fort,» commente David Bailey qui, à 76 ans, compte une myriade de célébrités à son tableau de chasse.

Le portrait a été commandé dans le cadre d’une campagne de marketing du gouvernement visant à promouvoir le Royaume-Uni auprès des touristes, étudiants et hommes d’affaires du monde entier.

Née le 21 avril 1926, Elizabeth II a l’habitude de célébrer son anniversaire en deux temps: en privé le jour J, puis au cours d’une cérémonie officielle un samedi de juin, où la météo est plus clémente, avec le célèbre défilé militaire du «Trooping the Colour» («salut aux couleurs»), près de Buckingham Palace.

April 18, 2014 at 12:24am
0 notes

Comment j’ai marché mon chien

Cécile David Weill

Comment j’ai marché mon chien

Le Point.fr - Publié le 17/04/2014 à 10:42

Au bout de quelques années à New York, les conversations entre Français deviennent cocasses. Petit dictionnaire des anglicismes qui envahissent leur quotidien.

New York, mars 2013.New York, mars 2013. © Emmanuel Dunand / AFP
Par  (À NEW YORK)

Inutile, entre Français de New York, de se demander depuis quand on a quitté la France. Il suffit de compter les anglicismes utilisés pour le deviner. Ainsi les expatriés les plus récents dont la langue maternelle va encore de soi réservent leurs inquiétudes linguistiques à l’anglais, dans lequel ils ont peur de confondre blow dry (brushing) avec blow job (fellation) et caretaker (gardien) avec undertaker(croque-mort).

Mais les choses se gâtent après deux ou trois ans aux États-Unis, lorsque les contours du français s’estompent, et que les faux amis font irruption dans les conversations. Un “point” devient ainsi un argument pertinent, que l’on “fait” (make a point) dans une discussion, au lieu de le mettre sur les i, comme on l’aurait fait en France. De même qu’au lieu de se faire “délivrer un passeport” ou de se faire “livrer des fleurs”, on se fait “délivrer” une pizza ; que l’on “contemple” au lieu d’envisager ; ou qu’on ne “se présente plus” les uns aux autres, mais qu’on “s’introduit”.

Les choses s’aggravent encore après cinq ans d’immersion dans la ville. Car on ne traite plus un problème, on “l’adresse” ; on n’appuie plus sur des boutons, on “presse dessus”. On ponctue ses phrases de l’expression “à la fin de la journée” (at the end of the day, “au bout du compte”), on parle “de neurose” au lieu de névrose, et on se déclare “obsessif” au lieu d’obsessionnel, lorsqu’on ne se demande pas si untel a une affair (liaison) avec quelqu’un d’autre.

No man’s land

Puis on atteint un sommet lorsque les choses ne sont plus “sensées”, mais qu’elles “font du sens” comme si elles en fabriquaient ; que l’on qualifie les infirmières de “nurse” ; que les gens ne sont plus célèbres, mais “fameux” ; que les metteurs en scène deviennent des “directeurs de cinéma” ; que l’on parle de “confidence” et non de confiance ; ou encore lorsque l’on dit vouloir “faire la différence” (make a difference) au lieu de “changer les choses”.

Mais rien ne vaut le no man’s land linguistique dans lequel on entre au bout de dix ans : Car l’on “marche” son chien (walk the dog) au lieu de le promener ; on “marie” son voisin de palier (marry) plutôt que de l’épouser. On intime de “faire une gauche” (make a left) au lieu de “tourner à gauche”, et l’on assure “qu’on est dessus” (traduction littérale de I am on it), à la place de “je m’en occupe”. Lorsque l’on ne parsème pas ses propos de mots anglais tels que lecar pour désigner sa voiture, ou l’office pour évoquer son bureau. L’incertitude linguistique concerne désormais le français. Aussi on s’inquiète de confondre la construction de “tu me manques” avec celle de I miss you en disant : “je te manque”, c’est-à-dire l’exact opposé de ce qu’on voulait dire. Et l’on craint de déraper en déplorant qu‘“il pleuve des chats et des chiens” (it rains cats and dogs) plutôt que “des cordes”.

Heureusement il y a pire, ainsi le charabia des latinos polyglottes, lorsqu’ils panachent leur spanglish d’un peu de franglais en se décrétant tour à tour “humil” (de l’adjectif espagnol humilde, humble), entourés d’amis “exorbitants”, ou pleins “d’osadi” (d’osadía, audace). Ouf !

April 17, 2014 at 11:22pm
0 notes

Chasse aux déficits : et si la France s’inspirait de la big society britannique ?

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE : A l’heure où le gouvernement cherche à faire des économies, le modèle britannique de Big society peut être éclairant: au delà d’une simple cure d’austérité, il invite à déleguer à la société civile une partie du rôle de l’Etat.




Eudoxe Denis est l’auteur, en collaboration avec Laetitia Strauch, du rapport Royaume-Uni, l’autre modèle? La Big Society de David Cameron et ses enseignements pour la France, publié par l’Institut de l’entreprise en mars 2014.


La Big Society de David Cameron, un modèle à suivre pour une France en crise? A première vue, la question peut sembler provocatrice.

Après avoir figuré au cœur du discours politique de David Cameron durant la campagne de 2010, et innervé l’ensemble des actions du nouveau gouvernement de coalition à son arrivée au pouvoir, le concept de Big Society a en effet connu divers avatars.

Sous ce terme, le premier ministre Britannique entendait transformer radicalement les rapports entre l’Etat et la société civile, en s’appuyant sur les ressources qui constituent cette dernière pour réformer des services publics et un Etat providence à bout de souffle.

L’expression de Big Society renvoyait à la célèbre assertion deMargaret Thatcher selon laquelle «la société n’existe pas, seuls existent les individus». Pour David Cameron, au contraire, «la société existe bel et bien ; ce n’est juste pas la même chose que l’Etat». Ce sont toutes ces institutions intermédiaires, formelles comme informelles, choisies ou héritées de la tradition, qui permettent à la sociabilité naturelle de l’individu de s’épanouir et aux échanges de prospérer. Cette société civile préexiste à l’Etat, et c’est justement sa confusion avec l’Etat qui a contribué à l’affaiblir. Devenu hégémonique, ce dernier n’a plus en face de lui que des individus atomisés, et une société désormais «brisée», dont les symptômes sont connus, de la persistance des inégalités sociales qu’entraine la désagrégation de la famille à la culture de l’assistanat.

Devenu hégémonique, l’Etat n’a plus en face de lui que des individus atomisés, et une société désormais « brisée », dont les symptômes sont connus, de la persistance des inégalités sociales qu’entraine la désagrégation de la famille à la culture de l’assistanat

Toute l’originalité du discours sur la Big Society consistait à chercher un remède à ces maux dans les ressorts de la société elle-même, plutôt que dans le renforcement de l’Etat ou l’accroissement de la dépense publique. Prenant acte de l’antériorité historique d’une «société providence» à l’essor de l’Etat du même nom, il s’agissait ici de mobiliser différentes initiatives, que celles-ci naissent d’institutions formelles (le «tiers secteur») - organisations caritatives, mutuelles, coopératives, entreprises sociales, - comme informelles - réseaux de voisinage, solidarités locales, bref tout ce que les anglo-saxons désignent sous le terme de «communautés» - pour entreprendre de reconstruire la société. Et dès lors que la société civile est à reconstruire, l’Etat avait ici paradoxalement un rôle actif à jouer, comme catalyseur des initiatives sociales.

Enfin, plutôt qu’un programme précis à mettre en œuvre, la Big Society se présentait comme une vision directrice pour l’action du gouvernement, comme l’illustre la diversité des politiques placées sous son égide: l’ouverture des services publics aux initiatives privées, qu’elles soient issues des entreprises, du tiers secteur ou des «communities», la réforme de l’éducation et celle du système de santé, la politique de décentralisation et la promotion du «localisme», le soutien au tiers secteur et à l’action civique, et enfin la réforme du système de prestations sociales et des incitations au retour à l’emploi.

Près de quatre ans après, le concept reste controversé: certains y voient un échec, d’autres critiquent des renoncements, d’autres enfin en soulignent les succès et les innovations. Certes, la mise en œuvre de la Big Society s’est effectuée conjointement à une politique d’austérité sans précédent depuis l’après-guerre. Or les modalités de cette politique d’austérité - et non la nécessité de l’austérité elle-même - ayant fait débat, la perception de la Big Society par l’opinion publique s’en est trouvée mitigée et a conduit le gouvernement à en abandonner l’expression. Faut-il conclure de cet abandon sémantique à celui de l’esprit qui y préside et aux réformes qui en sont issues? Nullement: la tentative de réforme de l’ensemble des services publics, même si elle n’en est qu’à ses débuts, reste digne d’intérêt.

En particulier, la généralisation des mécanismes de rémunération au résultat dans la fourniture des services publics, la conversion progressive de l’ensemble des écoles publiques en établissements autonomes, l’expérimentation, au niveau le plus local, de nouveaux modèles de co-production du service public ou l’introduction d’outils de financement privé dans le financement du secteur social sont autant de signes de transformation silencieuse de grande ampleur que nous aurions tort d’ignorer.

Plus que les dépenses publiques, c’est le recours à l’Etat que la Big Society vise à réduire ; l’horizon de temps sur laquelle elle se déploie est donc par définition différent de celui du simple redressement budgétaire.

Au-delà, c’est l’inspiration initiale qui importe. L’ambition de la Big Society est de décrire - positivement pourrait-on dire - ce que serait une société caractérisée par un Etat moins hégémonique. Plus que les dépenses publiques, c’est le recours à l’Etat que la Big Society vise à réduire ; l’horizon de temps sur laquelle elle se déploie est donc par définition différent de celui du simple redressement budgétaire. C’est bien sûr ce qui fait tout son intérêt, à l’heure où la plupart des gouvernements peinent à articuler un discours positif sur l’austérité.

En s’interrogeant sur le fonctionnement et la légitimité d’un Etat providence en crise et en montrant que les failles de ce dernier sont d’abord morales et intellectuelles avant d’être économiques, la Big Society s’offre aussi comme la seule alternative véritable à un modèle social-démocrate fantasmé par l’ensemble de la classe politique française.

Comment ne pas voir en effet les failles de cette social-démocratie, qui est somme toute «un arrangement en vertu duquel nous cessons d’être les principaux responsables de notre propre comportement, pour l’être en retour de celui de tous les autres», selon l’excellente formule de T.E Utley? Et ce dernier d’ajouter, clairvoyant, que «les tentations que cette disposition offre à la feinte indignation (…) et à l’évasion pure à l’égard du devoir sont infiniment trop grandes pour l’homme déchu».

Droite et gauche communient dans notre pays dans le même idéal - celui d’un «modèle social français» qu’il s’agirait de préserver à tout prix, et qui repose sur l’idée que la seule solidarité légitime est celle qu’encadre l’Etat. Les mêmes ne semblent pas voir que la société française se caractérise chaque jour davantage par une défiance généralisée, tant des citoyens envers les institutions que des citoyens entre eux, ni que le versement de prestations sociales ne saurait tenir lieu de lien social. Au nom de la «cohésion sociale», l’Etat se targue en France de puiser sa légitimité dans la résolution des conflits - la vie civile n’étant pas capable d’engendrer autre chose selon une certaine conception républicaine - plutôt que dans faculté à créer des incitations, à rendre autonome et capable.

Apprendre à distinguer cette «cohésion sociale» de la nécessaire vigueur d’une société civile digne de ce nom, donc véritablement indépendante, voilà ce qui nous semble aujourd’hui essentiel. Il est donc temps d’imaginer un nouvel équilibre qui mette pleinement la sphère publique au service de la société civile.

8:40pm
0 notes

Les Français lynchés dans une publicité Cadillac →

6:51pm
0 notes

"La culture britannique est la plus sexiste du monde" →